*Note for students:

The syllabi here give a general idea of the courses. All the syllabi will be revised and updated on Blackboard during the semester when the courses are taught. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, 2017 – present 

Boston University, Pardee School of Global Studies

 

 

COURSES:

  • The United States in South Asia since 1940 (IR377) Syllabus*

Fall 2017 (5 students), Spring 2020 (~30 students)

 

What were the characteristics of U.S. policies and presence in South Asia during the Second World War? How did decolonization influence South Asia, and how did decolonized South Asia influence U.S. policies in the region? What were the characteristics of U.S. political, diplomatic and economic policies toward India, Pakistan, China, Burma, and Afghanistan? How did interstate wars and crises elsewhere affect U.S. policies in the region, notably, the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Vietnam War? What are the long-term trends in the global history of South Asia since WWII to this day? What can we understand about current foreign policy problems like refugee issues, separatist movements, nuclear weapons, communal violence and terrorism from studying the recent past of South Asia? These are some of the questions that this course will examine. No prior background in South Asia is required for taking this course.  

 

 

  • International Nuclear Politics (IR315/HI335/PO358) Syllabus*

Spring 2018 (47 students, co-taught), Fall 2018 (40 students), Spring 2020 (~45 students)

 

What are the causes and consequences of nuclear weapons and their related technologies? How are nuclear technologies, equipment and materials managed at the international, regional and national levels? What is the ‘global atomic marketplace’ and how can it be controlled to contain proliferation threats? What are the tools of nonproliferation and counterproliferation that have been historically adopted by the United States and its allies? What policy lessons can be derived from those past policies? How has radioactive poisoning from nuclear tests, nuclear facilities and accidents affected lives, and how have effective has mitigation been? These are some of the questions that this course will examine. No background in nuclear issues is required for taking this course.

 

 

  • History, Policy & Statecraft (IR539) Syllabus

Summer Term I 2020 (~15 students)

 

What can we learn from our recent past? How effective is historical analysis to resolve contemporary policy problems? What is counterfactual reasoning? How could we effectively employ historical analogies to understand the present? How could we effectively use primary sources obtained through archival research for policy analysis and research? What is oral history and how can we effectively conduct oral history interviews for research? These are some of the questions that this course will collectively examine and seek to answer. The course will connect history with current public policy problems in the United States and the World such as immigration, incarceration, forever wars, race relations, business-government relations, and others. 

 

 

  • History of International Relations since 1945 (IR350) Syllabus*

Spring 2018 (176 students), Fall 2018 (77 students), Fall 2019 (83 students)

 

What are the causes and consequences of the global Cold War? How was the twentieth-century international system transformed by East-West conflict, North-South disparity and South-South cooperation and competition? What lessons can be drawn from this recent past? How did the U.S. national security state emerge and consolidate itself after the Second World War? What role did nuclear weapons play in U.S. foreign policy, and those of its closest rivals, notably, the Soviet Union and China? How did the process of decolonization shape and reshape the global politics of the 1960s? What role did transnational activism in human rights and environmental politics of the 1970s play? How did the global War on Terror influence the emergence of new technologies in warfare? These are some of the questions that this course will examine. The course will contextualize present-day international and regional conflicts and cooperation in the recent past, collectively analyze primary source documents, and discuss policy implications. 

 

 

  • Politics of Nuclear Weapons (IR522) Syllabus*

Fall 2019 (~10 students)

 

What are the causes and consequences of nuclear weapons and their related technologies? How are nuclear technologies, equipment and materials managed at the international, regional and national levels? What is the ‘global atomic marketplace’ and how can it be controlled to contain proliferation threats? What are the tools of nonproliferation and counterproliferation that have been adopted by the United States and its allies? What policy lessons can be derived from those past policies? How has radioactive poisoning from nuclear tests, nuclear facilities and accidents affected lives, and how effective have mitigation and redressal been? These are some of the questions that this course will examine.

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